This post is part of the Donohoo Descendancy Project. Annie M. Sanford married Howard H. Donohoo, a son of Michael Donohoo, grandson of Patrick Donohoo.


To learn about Howard H. Donohoo’s life until age 45: The Traveling Salesmen: Ansel B. and Howard H. Donohoo, Part II
To learn about Annie M. Sanford’s life until age 33: Miss Annie M. Sanford: Accomplished Woman Musician of Georgia


Somewhere in all their social events and business travels, Howard H. Donohoo, salesman and  socialite, and Annie M. Sanford, musician and entertainer, crossed paths. They wed sometime between late 1904 and early 1906. [1] As individuals that were frequently in the social columns of the newspaper, they kept their wedding quiet, as no article nor document mentioning the nuptials has been found.

The newlywed couple established themselves in Little Rock, Arkansas, arriving in May 1906, and buying a home at the corner of 26th and Wolfe Streets. [2]

Together, the couple created a powerhouse children’s operetta touring production. They traveled from place to place, auditioning and then training upwards of 200 children per show in each city. The combination of Howard’s salesmanship and business prowess, and Annie’s musical reputation and innovative teaching methods impressed audiences everywhere they toured.

“The children- well, …people just don’t know what children can do, until they see these taking part in the ‘Little Princess’… Mrs. Donohoe has trained twenty thousand children, but never has she trained children in so brief a time…”‘[3]

“As has been said before Mrs. Donohoo is a remarkable instructor and decidedly clever woman. She is a delightful instructor, a fine musician and her ability to handle children is wonderful. Mr. Donohoo handles the business end of the engagements and is as efficient in his line as Mrs. Donohoo is in hers.” [4]

Between 1906 and 1911, the couple produced “The Little Princess” in Jackson, Mississippi; Little Rock, Arkansas; Huntsville, Alabama; Charlotte, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina. [5]

“It is really wonderful that two hundred children of assorted sizes from tots scarce 3 years old to misses in their early teens could in the space of three weeks be so perfectly drilled as were the participants in ‘The Little Princess’…” [6]

“The performance was carried out without a hitch or accident of any kind, and in view of the fact that more than 200 children took part in the performance this was nothing short of remarkable.” [7]

 

They then produced “Queen of Beauty” for several showings in Asheville, North Carolina and Augusta, Georgia. “Queen of Beauty received the same success and wide acclaim during its Southern tour that “The Little Princess” had.[8]

The Donohoos next established the College Hill School of Music in McComb, Mississippi. Using Annie’s methods of teaching, the school offered a thorough curriculum and boasted “advantages that cannot be found outside of the great conservatories of America.” [9]

For nearly twenty years, Howard and Annie dominated the field of children’s musical training and production throughout the South. Then, they faded from the scene. It is unknown where and when Howard Hynes Donohoo died, nor where he is buried. [10] By 1937, a widowed Annie lived in Asheville, North Carolina, supporting herself as a music teacher. [11] She lived in Asheville [12] until her death in 1959 at the age of 88. [13]


Source Citations & Research Notes:
[1] In October 1904, Annie presents the “Little Princess” in Greenwood, South Carolina, as Miss Annie Sanford.

“The entertainment given…” Greenwood Daily Journal ‎(Greenwood, South Carolina)‎. 12 October 1904, Wednesday. Page 3. Accessed at newspapers.com on 19 March 2016.
The next newspaper mention found for either Howard or Annie is in May 1906. The couple arrived together as Mr. and Mrs. Donohoo in Little Rock, Arkansas.

“Mr and Mrs Donohoo are in the city.” Daily Arkansas Gazette ‎(Little Rock, Arkansas)‎. 20 May 1906, Sunday. Page 18. Accessed at newspapers.com on 26 December 2015.
[2] “J.F. Hammett and wife…” Daily Arkansas Gazette ‎(Little Rock, Arkansas)‎. 30 May 1906, Wed. Page 5. Accessed at newspapers.com on 27 December 2015.
“H.H. Donohoo Buys Residence.” Daily Arkansas Gazette ‎(Little Rock, Arkansas)‎. 3 June 1906, Sun. Page 5. Accessed at newspapers.com on 26 December 2015.
[3] “Little Princess.” The Charlotte News ‎(Charlotte, North Carolina)‎. 23 February 1911, Thu. Page 5. Accessed at newspapers.com on 18 December 2015.
[4] “A recent issue…” The Wilmington Morning Star ‎(Wilmington, North Carolina)‎. 4 March 1911, Sat. Page 6. Accessed at newspapers.com on 18 December 2015.
[5] “The Little Princess.” Arkansas Democrat ‎(Little Rock, Arkansas)‎. 27 May 1906, Sunday. Page 8. Accessed at newspapers.com on 17 May 2016.
“Huntsville, Ala. The Little Princess…” The Tennessean ‎(Nashville, Tennessee)‎. 7 November 1909, Sun. Page 20. Accessed at newspapers.com on 26 December 2015.
“Little Princess is Splendid.” Asheville Gazette-News ‎(Asheville, North Carolina)‎. 4 August 1910, Thu. Page 5. Accessed at newspapers.com on 18 December 2015.
“Two Amateur Plays…” The Evening Chronicle ‎(Charlotte, North Carolina)‎. 2 February 1911, Thu. Page 6. Accessed at newspapers.com on 18 December 2015.
“Amusements: The “Little Princess.” The Charlotte Observer ‎(Charlotte, North Carolina)‎. Fri, Feb 24, 1911. Page 2. Accessed at newspapers.com on 21 January 2015.
“Amusements: Matinee Excellent.” The Charlotte News ‎(Charlotte, North Carolina)‎. Wed, Mar 1, 1911. Page 2. Accessed at newspapers.com on 21 January 2015.
“The Little Princess A Grand Success.” The Wilmington Morning Star ‎(Wilmington, North Carolina)‎, Fri, Apr 21, 1911, Page 6. Accessed at newspapers.com on 21 January 2015.
[6] “Perfect Drilling” Daily Arkansas Gazette ‎(Little Rock, Arkansas)‎. 26 May 1906, page 7. Accessed at newspapers.com on 17 March 2016.
[7] “The Jackson…” Daily Arkansas Gazette ‎(Little Rock, Arkansas)‎. 25 May 1906, Friday. Page 4. Accessed at newspapers.com 17 March 2016.
[8] “Queen of Beauty.” Asheville Citizen-Times ‎(Asheville, North Carolina)‎. 20 August 1911, Sun. Page 6. Accessed at newspapers.com on 18 December 2015.
“A large and appreciative audience…” Asheville Citizen ‎(Asheville, North Carolina)‎. Fri, Aug 25, 1911. Page 2. Accessed at newspapers.com on 21 January 2015.
“Second Production…” Asheville Gazette-News ‎(Asheville, North Carolina)‎. 26 August 1911, Sat. Page 5. Accessed at newspapers.com on 18 December 2015.
“Last night at the Auditorium…” Asheville Citizen-Times ‎(Asheville, North Carolina)‎. 26 August 1911, Sat. Page 2. Accessed at newspapers.com on 18 December 2015.
“Miss Blanche Loftain…” Asheville Citizen-Times ‎(Asheville, North Carolina)‎. 7 November 1911, Tue. Page 2. Accessed at newspapers.com on 24 March 2016.
[9]  Howard Hynes Donohoo. 1914 City Directory, McComb, Mississippi, USA. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 ‎[database on-line]‎. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
College Hill School of Music advertisement, page 2. 1914 City Directory, McComb, Mississippi, USA. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 ‎[database on-line]‎. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
[10] The last known record of the couple together is the 1920 U.S. Census, which shows the couple residing in McComb, Mississippi, at their music school.
United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch ‎(­https­://­familysearch­.­org­/­ark­:/­61903­/­1­:­1­:­MNT8­-­XJ8­ : accessed 20 March 2016)‎, Howard H Donohoo, McComb Ward 1, Pike, Mississippi, United States; citing sheet 5A, NARA microfilm publication T625 ‎(Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.)‎; FHL microfilm 1,820,891.
No further records have been found for Howard H. Donohoo, not even regarding his death.
[11]  Annie S. Donohoo. 1937 Asheville, North Carolina City Directory. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 ‎[database on-line]‎. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
[12] Annie S. Donohoo. 1940 Asheville, North Carolina City Directory. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 ‎[database on-line]‎. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Annie S. Donohoo. 1942 Asheville, North Carolina City Directory. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 ‎[database on-line]‎. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Annie S. Donohoo. 1943 Asheville, North Carolina City Directory. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 ‎[database on-line]‎. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
[13] “North Carolina, Deaths, 1931-1994,” index, FamilySearch ‎(­https­://­familysearch­.­org­/­pal­:/­MM9­.­1­.­1­/­FPGD­-­1L9­ : accessed 21 January 2015)‎, Howard Hynes Donohoo in entry for Annie Sandford Donohoo, 10 Oct 1959; citing Asheville, Buncombe, North Carolina, v 26A cn 26285, State Department of Archives and History, Raleigh; FHL microfilm 1,953,004.