The Finlay Family

Finding Our Ancestors, and Sharing Their Stories

Miss Annie M. Sanford: Accomplished Woman Musician of Georgia

This post is part of the Donohoo Descendancy Project. Annie M. Sanford married Howard H. Donohoo, a son of Michael Donohoo, grandson of Patrick Donohoo.


 

Miss Annie M. Sanford

Born to Vincent and Adella (Mahon) Sanford, in Georgia, July 4, 1871 [1], Annie M. Sanford showed great musical talent from a young age. She studied music at the Southern Female College at LaGrange (also known as Cox College) [2], the New England Conservatory (Boston, Mass.) [3], and the New York College of Music [4] She gained a reputation as an outstanding pianist [5], and violinist [6], as well as a musical director. It was likely while she studied in New York that she met James M. Cochrane. The couple wed in Manhattan on 27 October 1891 [7]; Annie was 20 years old.

“Cox College and Conservatory. Atlanta, Ga.”, 1900, The Digital Library of Georgia id: ful0964-85. Public Domain image.

 

By age 22, she was teaching and composing music [8] for Gordon Institute in Barnesville, Georgia, (now called Gordon State College). At the Institute, she directed elaborate commencement programs, and formed a thirty-piece orchestra (she played lead violin) [9]. She and James traveled to Atlanta in the summer of 1895 to purchase pianos for the school, and one for home. Annie was the Director of the Music Department by this time (age 24), which was gaining notoriety throughout Georgia for the fabulous music program. [10]

Annie and James played a large part in the production of the annual Barnesville Great Chautauqua Fourth of July event each year. [11] The couple also hosted and attended many musical events and entertainments in the community. [12]

 

A Delightful Musicale

 

Early in 1899, the Georgia Female Seminary and Conservatory of Music formed a new department of musical pedagogics, naming Mrs. Annie Sanford Cochrane as head of the department.  By just 27 years old, “…she has developed many new and original ideas as to methods in music teaching and she proposes to demonstrate these methods in her classes, which will be composed of music teachers…” [13] Annie was changing the face of music education in Georgia.

By the end of 1899, Annie lectured at the Southern Georgia Convention of Music Teachers, speaking on the “Ideal Normal Training School for Teachers.” She emphasized the importance of child psychology, music theory and music history as important courses of study for students who wished to become music teachers. [14]

In summer of 1900, she wrote a landmark article that gained great momentum in publications called “Influence of Music on the Diseased Mind” in which she put forth ideas about music assisting in health and healing. She wrote about examples of doctors using musical treatment in their asylums, and from historic examples of musical treatment of mental health ailments. [15]

Annie served as chair of the Georgia Federation of Women’s Clubs music committee for several years. Among other events, this committee arranged daily musical concerts performed by the best and accomplished female music students in Georgia for the Interstate Fair. All applications went through Annie Sanford Cochrane herself [16]

Mrs. Annie Sanford Cochrane, at age 29 in 1900, addressed the Georgia State Dept of Education regarding Music in the Schools. Her address was published in the annual report of that department. “Mrs. Cochrane spoke of the need there is for music to broaden the souls and uplift the ideals of children. ‘All teachers of music are in need of conversion,’ she said. ‘They should look on their scholars with more sympathy, more love. Enthusiasm and earnestness are needed to make a success in teaching anything, but especially is this true in teaching music.'” [17]

While her professional and public life was peaking, her private life seemingly fell apart early in 1901. At the beginning of their marriage, James and Annie were mentioned together frequently in both social and musical circles in the newspapers of Georgia. [See 12] Later into their marriage, Annie is mentioned more and more frequently alone, without mention of her husband at events. [18] Then, suddenly in mid-April 1901, her newspaper mentions change from Mrs. Annie Sanford Cochrane, back to her maiden name, Miss Annie M. Sanford.[19] Her professional work and social circles did not change, but her husband virtually disappears from any newspaper mentions after mid-April 1901, and apparently from Annie’s life as well.

The newly-single-again Annie M. Sanford continued as before. In April 1901, she managed a series of recitals throughout Georgia. [See 19] She was Chair of Musical Pedagogy at Brenau Conservatory. [20] By November 1901, the newspaper announced that Miss Sanford moved to an apartment in Atlanta at 20 Ellis Street [21], where she continued to entertain friends with musical parties. [22]

 

Fairy Spectacular Bonny Bell

Early in 1903, Annie Sanford began presenting children’s operettas, such as “Bonny Bell” in Atlanta [23], and throughout Georgia in 1904. [24] By mid 1904, she added “The Little Princess” to her musical tour, and expanded into South Carolina. [25] Annie’s portrait appeared in the newspaper along with acclaim for her children’s theatrical productions. [26]


By age 33, Annie M. Sanford had made a huge impression and change in musical pedagogy throughout Georgia. She was a woman of note in music and social circles, and doing well as a single woman again.

To be continued…


Source Citations & Research Notes:
[1] “North Carolina, Deaths, 1931-1994,” index, FamilySearch ‎(­https­://­familysearch­.­org­/­pal­:/­MM9­.­1­.­1­/­FPGD­-­1L9­ : accessed 21 January 2015)‎, Howard Hynes Donohoo in entry for Annie Sandford Donohoo, 10 Oct 1959; citing Asheville, Buncombe, North Carolina, v 26A cn 26285, State Department of Archives and History, Raleigh; FHL microfilm 1,953,004.
[2] “The Gordon Institute.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 10 August 1895, Sat. Page 7. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[3] “Musical Pedagogics.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 1 January 1899, Sun. Page 10. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[4] “A Delightful Musicale.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 25 February 1892, Thu. Page 5. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[5] “Mr and Mrs J.M. Cochrane…” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 18 April 1892, Mon. Page 2. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[6] “Barnesville’s Great Week.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 19 June 1895, Wed. Page 4. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[7] James Cochrane and Annie M. Sanford, 27 October 1891. Ancestry.com. New York, New York, Marriage Index 1866-1937 ‎[database on-line]‎. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1829-1940,” database, FamilySearch ‎(­https­://­familysearch­.­org­/­ark­:/­61903­/­1­:­1­:­24HG­-­97J­ : accessed 22 March 2016)‎, James Cochrane and Annie Sanford, 27 Oct 1891; citing Marriage, Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, New York City Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,452,198.
[8] See an image of the cover of Annie’s Cadet March composition at ­http­://­www­.­gordonstate­.­edu­/­photo­-­gallery­/­gordon­-­college­-­1872­-­1934­
[9] “Barnesville’s Great Week.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 19 June 1895, Wed. Page 4. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[10] “The Gordon Institute.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 10 August 1895, Sat. Page 7. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[11] “Barnesville’s Great Chautauqua.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 2 July 1898, Sat. Page 4. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[12] “A Delightful Musicale.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 25 February 1892, Thu. Page 5. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
“Mr and Mrs J.M. Cochrane…” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 18 April 1892, Mon. Page 2. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
“Mr. And Mrs. J.M. Cochrane…” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 30 April 1892, Sat. Page 8. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[13] “Musical Pedagogics.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 1 January 1899, Sun. Page 10. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[14] :  “At the recent convention…” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 5 November 1899, Sun. Page 21, 22. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[15] “Influence of Music on the Diseased Mind.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 29 July 1900, Sun. Page 15. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[16] “Through the instrumentality…” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 7 October 1900, Sun. Page 15. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[17] The Twenty-eighth Annual Report from the Department of Education to the General Assembly of the State of Georgia. Atlanta, Ga.: Geo. W. Harrison, State Printer ‎(The Franklin Prtg. And Pub. Co., 1900. Page 172-173
[18] “Tuesday, July 4, governor’s day…” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 30 June 1899, Fri. Page 5. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
“On Thursday evening…” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 3 February 1900, Sat. Page 11. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[19] “Mrs. Pollard and Mrs. Printup in Musical Recital.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 14 April 1901, Sun. Page 24. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[20] “From a Noted Musician.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 10 April 1904, Sunday. Page 5. Accessed at newspapers.com on 19 March 2016.
[21] “Miss Annie M. Sanford…” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 22 November 1901, Fri. Page 9. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[22] “To Miss Johnson.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 13 December 1901, Fri. Page 11. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[23] “Children’s Operetta.” The Atlanta Constitution ‎(Atlanta, Georgia)‎. 16 April 1903, Thu. Page 8. Accessed at newspapers.com on 22 March 2016.
[24] “Bonny Bell,” “Miss Annie M. Sandford.” The Abbeville Press and Banner ‎(Abbeville, South Carolina)‎. 20 July 1904, Wed. Page 4. Courtesy of University of South Carolina, Columbia,SC. Accessed at chroniclingamerica.loc.gov on 21 January 2015.
[25] “Mrs. Moorman requests…” The Gaffney Ledger ‎(Gaffney, South Carolina)‎. 9 August 1904, Tue. Page 4. Accessed at newspapers.com on 19 March 2016.
“Little Princess.” The Gaffney Ledger ‎(Gaffney, South Carolina)‎. 12 August 1904, Fri. Page 8. Accessed at newspapers.com on 19 March 2016.
“Miss Annie Sanford…” The Gaffney Ledger ‎(Gaffney, South Carolina)‎. 12 August 1904, Fri. Page 8. Accessed at newspapers.com on 19 March 2016.
“The entertainment given…” Greenwood Daily Journal ‎(Greenwood, South Carolina)‎. 12 October 1904, Wednesday. Page 3. Accessed at newspapers.com on 19 March 2016.
[26] “Annie Mildred Sanford.” The Gaffney Ledger ‎(Gaffney, South Carolina)‎. 16 August 1904, Tue. Page 1. Accessed at newspapers.com on 19 March 2016.
“Bonny Bell.” The Evening Index ‎(Greenwood, South Carolina)‎. 6 October 1904, Thu. Page 9. Accessed 19 March 2016.

« »

© 2017 The Finlay Family. Theme by Anders Norén.